fbpx Take a walk through Playland History

Take a walk through Playland History

Posted
Sat, 10/01/2005 - 8:00pm
Last updated
1 year ago
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A company that cares

In 1983, Donald Strickland and Anthony Strickland began producing see-saws and swing sets in a make-shift shop consisting of a converted mechanic's garage. It was truly a family effort with this father and son duo not only producing the structures but also selling them.

Time rolls on, and in 1990 there was a change with Anthony taking over the company as president and CEO and charting a course of developing the beginning of what is now the Playland Systems line of modular structures.

Enter the playground people merger as Playland becomes a division of Superior International Industries (SII) in 1997. SII had been around since 1991 and was started by Rob Pepper and Ray Derbecker, supplying components for commercial and residential playground industries alike. SII decided to join forces with Anthony Strickland and then form what would be the NEW Playland. It would be dedicated to the highest quality and safety standards in building affordable commercial outdoor play products.

It may seem that the founders started out as just investors, but what they saw was a chance to invest more than just money and go as far as to put heart and soul into advancing the playground industry and become lifelong “Playground People” who really care about the type of product they are marketing and the difference it can make for the children who use these structures.

Playland now has international sales teams as well, so its structures span the globe. Manufacturing space is well over 300,000 square feet, and in-house technologies of rotational molding, custom fabric forming and metal fabrication make it so Playland is able to actually produce 95 percent of the high-quality products it has to offer the playground industry.

For more information, log on to www.playland-inc.com.

Thinking Today About Tomorrow's Play™ The only magazine that is 100% dedicated to the Playground Industry

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